Psy 265 Critical Thinking

Courses

PSY 101 General Psychology I 0.0-3.0 Credits

Reviews the fundamental principles, concepts, and methods of psychology, with emphasis on the concepts of motivation, learning, and perception, and their psychological foundations.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PSY 111 Pre-Professional General Psychology I 3.0 Credits

Preprofessional General Psychology is designed for majors and for other preprofessionals who are interested in Psychology as a minor. A scientific approach to the study of psychology is taken. An overview of the fundamental principles of psychology across a variety of sub-disciplines is offered. Part one is part of a two-part sequence and focuses on the experimental bases of psychology.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PSY 112 Pre-Professional General Psychology II 3.0 Credits

Preprofessional General Psychology is designed for preprofessionals who are interested in psychology or related fields, especially designed for majors, and may be taken by minors of psychology. It follows Preprofessional General Psychology I and includes a laboratory component to enhance the scientific approach to psychology. Part two focuses on the application of scientific principles of psychology to human behavior.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: PSY 111 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 120 Developmental Psychology 3.0 Credits

Examines the nature of developmental processes-perceptual, intellectual, emotional, and social-and the factors influencing and limiting them.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PSY 140 Approaches to Personality 3.0 Credits

Discusses the major concepts of Freud, neo-Freudians, behaviorists, humanists, trait theorists, and others. Emphasizes understanding of self and others for psychotherapy and research. Fall.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PSY 150 Introduction to Social Psychology 3.0 Credits

Examines theoretical and research findings in personal experiences of interacting with others in family and group settings, and with society in general.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PSY 210 Evolutionary Psychology 3.0 Credits

Covers principles of genetics and evolution as applied to the behavior of the important types of living beings, from plants and unicellular organisms to the primates (including humans).

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSY 212 Physiological Psychology 3.0 Credits

Reviews neural foundations of behavior, including the study of nerve activity and brain function.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSY 213 Sensation and Perception 3.0 Credits

Examines the structure and function of the senses, including vision, hearing, touch, temperature, pain, olfaction, gustation, time, and kinesthesia. Considers interaction of the senses and their role in determining behavior.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSY 222 Psychological Problems of Modern Youth 3.0 Credits

Examines psychological problem areas frequently encountered by young adults in today's society, including identity crisis, family conflict, the new sexuality, drugs, and the search for intimacy.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSY 225 Child Psychopathology 3.0 Credits

This class will focus on the symptoms, etiology, and primary methods of treating common psychological disorders and problems of children and adolescence. The course will focus on diagnosis; assessment; specific therapeutic treatments; ethical issues; and gender, cultural, and developmental differences in symptoms, diagnosis, and response to treatment.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 240 [WI] Abnormal Psychology 3.0 Credits

Offers advanced course in the general study of personality. Focuses on the way our society defines, explains, and handles behavior perceived as deviant and "normal." Requires field trip. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PSY 242 Psychology of Disability 3.0 Credits

Psychological and social consequences of physical disability for the disabled person and his or her family and social network. Emphasis on disabilities of the sensory and nervous systems. Practicum component.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSY 244 Culture and Personality 3.0 Credits

This course focuses on comparing specific human behaviors (e.g. aggression, health), roles (e.g. gender), and psychological processes (e.g. cognition, emotion, perception) across cultures in order to ascertain similarities and differences among cultures around the globe. This course has an interdisciplinary focus.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 245 [WI] Sports Psychology 0.0-3.0 Credits

Covers sports psychology, which is the science of understanding, modifying, and predicting athletic performance or sports participation. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSY 250 [WI] Industrial Psychology 3.0 Credits

Covers theories, experiments, and problem-solving efforts of behavioral scientists in industrial settings for students interested in interpersonal relations, management, leadership, personnel, and applied psychology. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSY 252 Death and Dying 3.0 Credits

Explores death and dying from various perspectives, including the philosophical, psychological, sociocultural, and personal.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSY 254 Psychology of Sexual Behavior 3.0 Credits

Examines psychology of the individual coping with the sexual aspects of life.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSY 264 Computer-Assisted Data Analysis I 3.0 Credits

Covers data analysis using a mainframe statistical package covering basic elementary techniques of data reduction, manipulation, and statistical analysis.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 265 Computer-Assisted Data Analysis II 3.0 Credits

Covers more advanced statistical techniques, such as regression, correlation, analysis of variance, and multiple regression.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: (PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]) and PSY 264 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 280 Psychological Research I 3.0 Credits

This course provides an introduction to the issues, techniques and methodologies associated with conducting psychological research. Topics to be covered include the logic of research in psychology, important issues in deciding how to study various psychological phenomena, ethical issues and guidelines in conducting psychological research, design and analysis of psychological research, assessing threats to internal and external validity, methods used in the interpretation of psychological data, and writing research reports in the style used by research psychologists.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 264 [Min Grade: D] and PSY 265 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 285 Writing in Psychology 3.0 Credits

This course will build on students existing knowledge of psychology while helping them better evaluate and create various types of written documents commonly used to communicate information in the field of psychology (e.g., research articles, literature reviews, position papers). Emphasis is placed on a skills-based approach to acquiring knowledge of how to communicate information and applying that knowledge in various contexts.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: C] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: C]

PSY 290 History and Systems of Psychology 3.0 Credits

Examines the historical foundations of modern psychology, with emphasis on the growth, contributions, and decline of major systems and theories.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 305 Science and Pseudoscience in Psychology 3.0 Credits

Science and Pseudoscience in Psychology. Fosters critical thinking skills regarding the evaluation of paranormal, unusual, or extraordinary phenomena (e.g. ESP, recovered memories of abuse). Examines ways that a human cognition leads to strange beliefs despite contradictory data. The distinctions between science and pseudoscience are highlighted.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 310 Drugs & Human Behavior 3.0 Credits

Covers the fundamentals of drug effects on the nervous system and behavior, with emphasis on abused substances and drugs used in the treatment of behavioral disorders.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: (PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D])

PSY 312 Cognitive Neuroscience 3.0 Credits

Cognitive neuroscience is the bridge between cognitive psychology and neuroscience: how the “hardware” of our brains produces the “software” of thought. This course will introduce the neural basis of core cognitive processes such as perception, attention, memory, language, and executive functions. From movies to eye-catching headlines, cognitive neuroscience is all around us. The goal of this course is to immerse students in the research behind the splashy stories, so that they can become a better consumer (and perhaps creator) of the growing knowledge of the human brain.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 320 [WI] Educational Psychology 3.0 Credits

Covers role and relevance of psychology in the teacher-learner relationship, with independent application of research techniques in an individual field study. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 322 Advanced Developmental Psychology 3.0 Credits

Provides in-depth exploration of child and adolescent physical, cognitive/intellectual, and psychosocial development. Students have the opportunity to observe children and their caregivers through videotaped vignettes created to bring developmental principles to life.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: (PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]) and PSY 120 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 325 Psychology of Learning 3.0 Credits

Introduces basic principles of the science of learning. Emphasizes I. P. Pavlov's classical conditioning, B. F. Skinner's operant conditioning, and applications to counseling and therapy.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 330 Cognitive Psychology 3.0 Credits

Covers human thought processes, including perception and pattern recognition, learning and memory, language, problem-solving, and decision-making.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 332 Human Factors and Cognitive Engineering 3.0 Credits

Discusses ways of designing machines, operations, and work environments so that they match human capacities and limitations.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 335 Pediatric Psychology 3.0 Credits

The focus of this seminar is the examination of psychosocial and medical issues during the period of infancy, childhood, and adolescense including relevant biological, cognitive, social, emotional, and cultural aspects.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 336 Psychology of Language 3.0 Credits

This course is a survey of the theories and methodologies in the psychology of language. It covers topics such as language acquisition, comprehension, and production, as well as the relation between language and thought and the question of the uniqueness of language in the animal kingdom.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSY 337 Human-Computer Interaction 3.0 Credits

Applies cognitive and experimental psychology to understanding how to improve the design and usability of interactive computing systems.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 342 Counseling Psychology 3.0 Credits

Covers theory and practice of establishing helping relationships. Includes role-playing, analyzing, and observations.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 345 Narrative Psychology 3.0 Credits

This course explores the historic contributions to the narrative tradition in psychology and its current research and theoretical concerns. We will discuss contributions to the construction of meaning from bioethics and medical humanities, qualitative research, the neuroscience of memory, literary theory, and social, cognitive, and developmental psychology.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Sophomore
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 350 Advanced Social Psychology 3.0 Credits

Provides in-depth exploration of topics in the social influence process, including current research in social cognition, attitude change, and group dynamics.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 150 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 352 Environmental Psychology 3.0 Credits

Multidisciplinary study of the interrelationship between human behavior and the natural, built, and social environments.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSY 355 Health Psychology 3.0 Credits

Health Psychology is designed to: concentrate on the application of psychological theories and variables to compromising and health enhancing behaviors; demonstrate the psychological management of chronic illness; and the role of psychologists written medical and health settings. For example, it focuses on the effects of stress on the body, the mind-body connection, and how psychology can affect physical well-being.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 356 Women's Health Psychology 3.0 Credits

Explores the major psychological and behavioral factors influencing health and illness among women. Topics, such as lifecycle challenges (PMS and reproductive health), chronic diseases, and new directions in health promotion are addressed.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 357 The Psychology of Eating Disorders and Obesity 3.0 Credits

Covers determinants of eating behavior and body weight as well as psychological treatments for them. Factors influencing eight regulation will be reviewed. The causes, consequences, and treatments for anorexia and bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder will be reviewed. Finally, the courses will review the causes, consequences and treatments for obesity.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 360 [WI] Experimental Psychology 3.0 Credits

Provides a study of the basic scientific fundamentals of the experiment with emphasis upon the critical thinking this method represents in establishing psychological principles. Contrasts are made to such modern pseudosciences as parapsychology. A final experiment is required of all students in this course. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: PSY 265 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 365 Computer-Assisted Data Analysis II 3.0 Credits

Covers more advanced statistical techniques, such as regression, correlation, analysis of variance, and multiple regression.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 364 [Min Grade: D] and (PSY 112 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 101 [Min Grade: D])

PSY 368 Critical Psychology 3.0 Credits

In this course we examine underlying values and beliefs of the field and place them in the context such as inequity, social justice, power relations, and what type of knowledge counts, to arrive at a more critical understanding of the practices and theories in psychology.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 370 Forensic Psychology 3.0 Credits

This course describes the psychological processes involved in the legal system. The material delves into the growing field of psychological study and application in the legal field.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 371 Law and Psychology 3.0 Credits

Law and Psychology will provide basic and more specific information regarding this area of specialization in psychology. It will include a definition, description of the scope of the field, overview of important questions, relevant research approaches, and applications. Important question/topics will include criminal and juvenile offending; the psychology of police; the process between arrest, trial, and incarceration; eyewitness identification; confessions; psychological evaluations in criminal and civil law; jury selection and decision-making; the psychology of victims of crime and violence; punishment and sentencing; and juvenile and adult corrections.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 111 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 380 Psychological Testing and Assessment 3.0 Credits

Enables the student to gain an understanding of the proper uses and applications of psychological evaluation by focusing on psychometric properties and reviewing selected tests and evaluation procedures commonly employed by psychologists in research and clinical practice.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 280 [Min Grade: D] and PSY 360 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 410 Neuropsychology 3.0 Credits

Provides a study of the relationship between human brain function and behavior. Examines basic anatomy of the brain and focuses on principles of human neuropsychological functioning. Studies cortical and "higher cognitive functioning" in depth through a focus on both normal and brain-injured individuals.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 440 Advanced Personality Seminar 3.0 Credits

Examines historical and contemporary trends and methods in personality research and assessment. Students have an opportunity to evaluate strengths and limitations of these trends and methods, as well as develop their own ideas.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 140 [Min Grade: D] and (PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D])

PSY 442 Theories & Practices in Clinical Psychology 3.0 Credits

Provides an overview of clinical psychology theory and practice including professional issues, assessment strategies, and psychotherapy theories. Students have the opportunity to develop their own philosophy of clinical psychology and to apply theories to case examples.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 445 Positive Psychology 3.0 Credits

The course provides an overview of the emerging subfield of psychology known as "positive psychology". This area focuses on investigating and understanding positive aspects of well-being and health, including various human strengths, such as resilience, optimism, spirituality, hope, and problem-solving.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 450 Autism Spectrum Disorders 3.0 Credits

This course introduces students to research and issues involving individuals with autism spectrum disorders. Topics include societal perceptions of the disorder, epidemiology, advocacy, assessment and evaluation, adult issues, and legal issues. Course includes an overview of common interventions. Students plan and carry out interviews with individuals with autism as part of the final project.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Sophomore
Prerequisites: PSY 120 [Min Grade: C]

PSY 455 Psychology of Suicide and Non-Suicidal Self-Injury 3.0 Credits

This course focuses on the psychology of suicide and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). Topics will include assessment issues, risk and vulnerability factors, differences between suicide and NSSI, suicide across the life span, theories of suicide, prevention and treatment strategies, and special topics (e.g., suicide "by cop," euthanasia).

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 111 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 460 Advanced Experimental Psychology: Laboratory Applications and Techniques 0.0-3.0 Credits

Introduction to variety of laboratory techniques; survey of how basic psychological theories and knowledge influence actual practice in the psychological laboratory. Laboratory exercises will focus on development of the research skills necessary for independent research.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSY 463 Memory 3.0 Credits

What we call memory is a set of complex cognitive process that involves most of the brain. Memory is a challenging process to study, one that is still poorly understood. In this course we will review what we know about how memory and forgetting work. We will also study the ways in which memory is fallible and modifiable. We will review findings from behavior and cognitive psychology, cognitive neuroscience, and neuropsychology in order to try to understand how we remember and how we forget.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: PSY 101 [Min Grade: D] or PSY 112 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 477 Senior Seminar I 3.0 Credits

In-depth exploration of selected topics. Projects selected by students in consultation with professor.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSY 478 Senior Seminar II 3.0 Credits

Continuation of PSYCH 477.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman

PSY 490 [WI] Psychology Senior Thesis I 4.0 Credits

An in-depth exploration of selected topics. Projects are selected by students in consultation with a faculty member. The students conduct these projects over the course of three terms in which they take PSY 490, 491, and 492. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is PSY and classification is Senior.

PSY 491 [WI] Psychology Senior Thesis II 4.0 Credits

An in-depth exploration of selected topics. Projects are selected by students in consultation with a faculty member. The students conduct these projects over the course of three terms in which they take PSY 490, 491, and 492. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is PSY and classification is Senior.
Prerequisites: PSY 490 [Min Grade: D]

PSY 492 [WI] Psychology Senior Thesis III 4.0 Credits

An in-depth exploration of selected topics. Projects are selected by students in consultation with a faculty member. The students conduct these projects over the course of three terms in which they take PSY 490, 491, and 492. This is a writing intensive course.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Can enroll if major is PSY and classification is Senior.
Prerequisites: PSY 491 [Min Grade: D]

PSY I199 Independent Study in PSY 0.0-12.0 Credits

Self-directed within the area of study requiring intermittent consultation with a designated instructor.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

PSY I299 Independent Study in PSY 0.0-12.0 Credits

Self-directed within the area of study requiring intermittent consultation with a designated instructor.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

PSY I399 Independent Study in PSY 0.0-12.0 Credits

Self-directed within the area of study requiring intermittent consultation with a designated instructor.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

PSY I499 Independent Study in PSY 1.0-3.0 Credit

Self-directed within the area of study requiring intermittent consultation with a designated instructor.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

PSY T180 Special Topics in Psychology 0.0-12.0 Credits

Topics decided upon by faculty will vary within the area of study.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

PSY T280 Special Topics in Psychology 0.0-12.0 Credits

Topics decided upon by faculty will vary within the area of study.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

PSY T380 Special Topics in Psychology 0.0-12.0 Credits

Topics decided upon by faculty will vary within the area of study.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

PSY T480 Special Topics in Psychology 0.0-12.0 Credits

Topics decided upon by faculty will vary within the area of study.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

Courses

click on the course name to link to course description!


PSY 102 Foundations of Psychology
This course is intended primarily for psychology majors and is designed to prepare them for subsequent upper division courses in psychology. Topics covered will include: developmental processes, motivation, emotion, brain-behavior relationship, conditioning, and learning, perception, memory, personality, psychopathology, and social psychology.

PSY 105 Research Design and Statistics I
This course is intended primarily for psychology majors and it is the first course in a two-semester sequence of courses in research design and statistics as applied to the behavioral sciences. Topics to be covered include: background research skills, hypothesis development, research methodology, descriptive statistics (using calculator or computer), and an introduction to probability.

PSY 205 Research Design and Statistics II
This course is designed to provide the student with a collection of principles, methods, and strategies useful in planning, designing, writing, and evaluating research studies in the behavioral sciences. Topics include research designs, measurements, hypothesis testing, statistical significance, estimation, and the analysis of data. The use of computer statistical packages to analyze data will be emphasized.

PSY 235 Conditioning and Learning
The study of condition and learning can be focused on animal or human behavior. Traditionally, learning theory has used animal models in an attempt to understand basic processes of the modification of behavior through experience. Research in the area often focuses on conditioning and reinforcement mechanisms. In the last few decades, learning theory has become more biologically based as mechanisms of evolution have been incorporated into psychology.

PSY 240 Psychology of Personality
Personality Psychology study how individuals are influenced by enduring inner factors and the development of personality over the course of a lifetime. Personality psychologists are primarily employed in academic settings, teaching and conducting research.

PSY 265 Child and Adolescent Psychology
Provides understanding and appreciation of the interrelated growth processes of child development. These include physical, interpersonal, social, peer, self-developmental, emotional, and cognitive processes.

PSY 270 Social Psychology
Social psychology is the study of the individual within a social context, and involves applying social psychological principles to areas such as marketing, fundraising, prejudice reduction. Social psychologists are usually employed as professors or in industry. Some work as consultants, and a few work for non-profit organizations.

PSY 301 Experimental Psychology
Provides an introduction to the execution of planned laboratory experiments. Deals with problems in designing experiments, data collection and analysis, and the writing of research reports. Experiments will be conducted using human participant volunteers and may be conducted in numerous areas of psychology including: cognition, learning and memory, motivation, sensation and perception, social.

PSY 305 Applied Research Methods in Psychology
Designed to provide and opportunity for students to examine and conduct research in psychology using such non-experimental research methods as: naturalistic observation, survey, correlational, field study and program evaluation. Statistics, including the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) available on the campus computers.

PSY 320 Behavioral Neuroscience
Designed to teach the relationship between our behaviors (overt behaviors, cognitive processes, emotions and motivational states) and our biology (especially the nervous, endocrine, and immune systems). This "bio-behavioral" approach is used to examine such topics as human consciousness, learning and memory, and serious mental illnesses.

PSY 325 Psychology of Human Cognition
Is designed to teach the underlying principles of human cognition (i.e., attention, thinking, perception, comprehension, memory), experimentation and research in cognition, and the application of cognitive principles in applied settings.

PSY 330 Abnormal Psychology
Characteristics, causes, and treatments of the major types of maladaptive behavior are discussed. Topics covered include the current mental disorder classification system and contemporary forms of psychotherapy.

PSY 335 Psychology of Social Influence
An introduction to the principles of social influence. These principles will be applied to understanding topics such as attitude change, recruitment, retention in religious cults and other cult-like groups, product advertising, political advertising, fundraising techniques, public service campaigns, initiations and group loyalty, brainwashing.

PSY 340 Introduction to Clinical Psychology
This course will include discussion of how clinical psychologists assess symptoms of psychopathology, diagnose mental disorders, conceptualize clients' symptom reports, and develop treatment plans. Students will not be taught how to do assessment or psychotherapy but will learn about the assessment and psychotherapy approaches used by clinical psychologists. The purpose of the course is to provide the opportunity to integrate material learned in other courses and to learn more about the field of clinical psychology. Prerequisites: PSY 240 and PSY 330.

PSY 352 Psychology of Adulthood and Aging
Studies human development from the beginning of puberty to the climax of maturity. This psychosocial period of time is conceived of as a transitional phase during which an individual completes his personal autonomy.

PSY 355 Psychology of the Exceptional Child
Is a psychological investigation into the nature of human differences as manifested in children and youth. The course is concerned with the scientific study of physical, intellectual, social, and emotional development in unique children as well as individual, institutional, and cultural response to the exceptional child. Cultural, social, and scientific procedures for the definition of deference will be emphasized. Treatment and educational systems will be touched upon.

PSY 361 Psychology of Group Interaction
Surveys and analyzes the psychological constructs, research, and principles of group interaction. Throughout participation and observation of face to face groups, implications are drawn for work groups in education, industry, and social situations.

PSY 365 Multicultural Psychology
This course focuses on recent psychological research concerning the understanding of cultural differences and similarities in the way we think, feel, and behave. It is designed to introduce students to psychological issues concerning gender, cultural values, religion, race/ethnicity, individualism-collectivism, self-identity, group identity and group conflict, environmental ecology, culture and development, sexual orientation, psychological and physical disorders and disabilities, culture and communication. The discussions are geared toward promoting an understanding of human experience in a multicultural context. This course satisfies a diversity requirement for all students.

PSY 371 Undergraduate Research in Psychology I & II
Provides an opportunity for a student to do research under the guidance of selected faculty members for up to two semesters. Approval of research topic from the selected advisor should be obtained before registering for this course.

PSY 374 Advanced Research in Psychology I
Is the first of a two semester sequence of courses designed to provide psychology majors with an opportunity to conduct major a research project. In the first semester, students select a topic, do background research and write a detailed research proposal.

PSY 375 Advanced Research in Psychology II
Is the second of a two semester sequence of courses designed to provide psychology majors with an opportunity to conduct a major research project. In the second semester, students gather data, do appropriate statistical analysis, write a research report, and make an oral presentation of the project and its results.

PSY 381 Honors Thesis I
This is the first of a two-semester sequence of courses designed to provide students in the Psychology Honors Program an opportunity to develop and conduct a major research project.

PSY 382 Honors Thesis II
This is the second of a two-semester sequence of courses designed to provide students in the Psychology Honors Program an opportunity to develop and conduct a major research project.

PSY 384 Psychology of Person to Person Interaction
Focuses on the development of basic interviewing skills. Topics include mode of responses, creating a positive relationship, problem solving, effective feedback, and applications to special populations. Skill enhancing activities include role playing, video taping, and small group exercises.

PSY 385 Internship in Psychology I & II
Provides a variety of internship experiences which make available opportunities o broaden the psychology major's preparatory background. Contact the internship coordinator of the department of the department for more information.

PSY 393 Selected Topics in Psychology
Provides the opportunity for the department to offer courses in areas of departmental major interest which are not covered by the regular courses.

PSY 395 Selected Topics in Psychology
Studies concepts and research in areas of psychology not covered by the regular courses of study. Areas covered will be those in which there is a special expertise and in which there is a special student request.

PSY 397 Human Cognitive Development
Presents a life span approach to the study of human development with an emphasis on cognitive processes in infancy, childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. The purpose of the course is to familiarize the student with basic concepts, models, theories, and research in the field of cognitive development. Thus, models of gene-environment interaction, Piagetian, neo-Piagetian, information-processing approaches, and post-formal approaches will be discussed, as well as their application to perception, memory, language, intelligence, and wisdom development. This course will also introduce the student to practical applications of current theories of cognitive human development. It is recommended to have a prior course in Developmental Psychology and/or Cognition.

PSY 410 Psychology of Gender
This course will first focus on views of women in early psychology; we will then turn to an in-depth analysis of the psychological aspects of issues affecting women. Topics discussed will include: current and historical theories about women and sex differences; achievement motivation; women and mental illness; psychological aspects of menstruation; female sexuality; women's romantic relationships and friendships; reactions to victimization (rape, domestic violence, obsessive relationships and stalking, sexual abuse); psychological consequences of women's physical appearance; body image and eating disorders; prejudice and discrimination against women; consequences of inclusive vs. noninclusive language; improving communication and cooperation between men and women.

PSY 420 Health Psychology
Explores the biopsychosocial approach to understanding health and illness. Role of psychology in health promotion and prevention of illness will be discussed. Possible topics include pain management, encouragement of health-related behaviors and the relationship between stress and disease. Prerequisite: PSY101 or PSY102, junior standing or permission of instructor.

PSY 430 Sensation and Perception
Includes the study of human senses, sensory coding, neurological basis of sensation, perceptual process in vision and hearing, perceptual development, theories of perceptual experience, and the physiological basis of perception. Numerous demonstrations will be performed and experienced by students in the area of sensation and perception.

PSY 432 Psychology of the Internet
This course will examine the psychological implications of computers and their related Internet technologies on our social interactions and behaviors. Topics will include the influence of technology on our self-concept and identities, norm development in CMC and virtual communities, cyber-support, internet addiction, the influence of gender and status in our online social interactions, and the digital divide.

PSY 435 Psychopharmacology
Examines the absorption, metabolism, and elimination of psychoactive drugs. The mechanism of drug action, addiction, tolerance, and physical dependence will be studied.

PSY 440 History and Systems of Psychology
Explores the philosophical background, historical development, contemporary systems, and possible directions of psychology. NOT OPEN TO GRADUATE STUDENTS!

PSY 445 Psychology of Thnking
Deals with higher mental processes including problem solving, decision making, reasoning, languages and intelligence. The aim of this course is to inform the student of theories and research in these areas as well as to improve their thinking skills.

PSY 447 Multicultural Health Psychology
Explores the biopsychosocial approach to understanding health and illness. Role of psychology in health promotion and prevention of illness will be discussed. Possible topics include pain management, encouragement of health-related behaviors and the relationship between stress and disease. Prerequisite: PSY101 or PSY102, junior standing or permission of instructor.

PSY 450 Crisis Intervention
A conceptual and practical framework for providing crisis intervention is presented. Topics covered include the theory and philosophy of crisis intervention, problem solving, prevention and evaluation of intervention efforts. Applications discussed include working with groups, crime victims, suicidal individuals and bereaved persons. NOT OPEN TO GRADUATE STUDENTS!

PSY 465 Human Factors
Focuses on the application of psychological principles of human behavior, perception, and cognition to real-world environments. Topics include: Improving workplace and transportation safety, improving human-computer interaction, and discussing general ways that humans can work more easily and naturally with complex technologies in todays society. Students will conduct a design project on how to improve some aspect of human-technology interaction.

PSY 470 Legal Psychology
This course will inform students about the relationship between psychology and law by introducing them to contemporary psychological knowledge as it applies to the legal system. Topics will include: the psychology of evidence, the social psychology of the jury, the psychologist as expert witness, the psychology of jury selection, and research methods used by legal psychologists.

PSY 475 Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Examines the application of psychological research and theory to understanding human behavior in organizational settings. Topics include research approaches, learning and training, job stress, motivation, work satisfaction, organizational conflict, decision making, leadership behavior, and organizational design.

PSY 485 Tests and Measurements
Focuses on the statistical and psychological theory of tests and measurements. Prerequisite: A recent undergraduate statistics course.

PSY 490 Selected Topics in Psychology
Provides the opportunity for the department to offer courses in areas of department major interest which are not covered by the regular courses.

PSY 500 Advanced Research Design and Statistics
Is concerned with the scientific method to the investigation of behavior. Research methods and experimental design and statistics will be reviewed along with a survey of the more recent significant developments in the field of psychology. The use of computer statistical packages to analyze data will be emphasized. Students will demonstrate competency in descriptive statistics.

PSY 512 Theories of Learning
Examines the explanations of human learning processes offered by various behavioral and cognitive theorists. Classical and contemporary theories and applications are presented dealing with topics such as conditioning, motivation, memory and problem solving.

PSY 515 Theories of Personality
Explores theories, issues, and research in personality, and encourages the psychology graduate student to develop his or her own pragmatic orientation.

PSY 516 Motivation
Examines and compares different theories of motivation. Basic motives such as hunger, thirst, sex, and aggression in humans and animals will be examined. In addition, more complex motives will be discussed in light of decision theory.

PSY 518 Principles of Cognition and Behavior Modification
Study of applied techniques of modifying behavior and cognition. Includes stimulus control processes, reinforcement theory, modeling, extinction, desensitization, counterconditioning, cognitive restructuring, and stress inoculation theory.

PSY 519 Life Span Psychology
Life span development provides information about developmental processes from conception through adulthood. The interaction of environmental and genetic factors is stressed. Theoretical points of view are presented.

PSY 527 The Psychology of Adolescence
Is a systematic study of physical, behavioral, and psychological development of the individual from puberty to emerging adulthood.

PSY 529 The Psychology of Successful Aging
Focuses on the process of aging during the later years of the life span. The developmental approach provides the basis for the systematic study of aging. In addition, the interaction of the physiological, psychological, emotional, intellectual, and social aspects of aging are emphasized.

PSY 530 Psychology of the Exceptional Child
Concerned with findings of significant studies on the exceptional child. Emphasis given to the contricutions of research dealing with characteristics of the exceptional child, identification, ways of meeting special needs, and implications for the child and those who work with the child.

PSY 531 Advanced Cognitive Psychology
An in-depth analysis of new issues within the field of cognitive psychology is the focus of this course. Sample content includes models of memory, processes of cognition, implicit versus explicit memory, and problem solving.

PSY 532 Advanced Behavioral Neuroscience
Gives the student interested in brain-behavior relationships an introduction to experimental manipulations commonly used in the research area. Students will do extensive reading within a selected area of research as preparation for a series of demonstrations that will use several invasive techniques routinely used in the field. Both neurophysiological and behavior observations will be made in order to test specific experimental hypotheses.

PSY 533 Social Cognition
The study of how people make sense of others and of themselves; how ordinary people think about people; and how they think they think about people.

PSY 534 Research in Abnormal Psychology
Review research and theoretical contributions to the understanding of abnormal behavior, with primary emphasis on discussion of recent research findings regarding the etiology of various mental disorders.

PSY 540 History of Psychology
Reviews history of psychology from its roots in philosophy through its transformation into a science. Included is a critical examination of major issues, assumptions, and schools of thought. GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY!

PSY 590 Introduction to Group Dynamics
Examines the theory and experiences of group interaction. Observation and participation in face-to-face groups of varying structures and functions are provided. Theories of group development and observational systems and techniques applicable in educational, business, and institutional settings are examined. Selected topics include goal analysis, functional group structures, leadership influence, conforming norm pressure, deviant behaviors, and communication network patterns.

PSY 594 Selected Topics in Psychology (graduate)
Provides students with an opportunity to study concepts and research in areas of psychology not covered by the regular course of study in a seminar setting. Areas covered will be those in which instructors have special expertise and in there is a special student request.

PSY 598 Independent Study
Independent study is available for credit.

PSY 612 Thesis I
This course is designed to provide master's degree candidates with an opportunity to conduct a major research project. A research proposal, literature review, and a pilot study are required. This is the first course in a two course sequence.

PSY 613 Thesis II
This is the second of a two semester sequence of graduate courses designed to provide master's degree candidates with an opportunity to conduct a major research project. In this course, students implement the research proposal designed in Thesis I. They collect data, complete a statistical analysis, write a research report and make an oral presentation. Students will experience the procedure and format of conducting a research project that might be prepared for publication in a psychological journal.

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